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See the Light aims to drive switch to LEDs

Andrew Brister 5 November 2014
See the Light aims to drive switch to LEDs

A new campaign asks householders: “If there was an easy step that you could take to reduce global warming – and save money on household bills – would you do it?”

High profile figures from the interior design and lighting industries, including Oliver Heath and Kevin McCloud, have come together to promote the switch to LED based upon the environmental benefits. As evenings and mornings draw in and lights are switched on longer, the campaigners want everyone to understand the energy savings to be gained by LED lighting.

A switch to LED can reduce an electricity bill to a tenth of the cost for a conventional lighting scheme. According to recent figures, if 90% of households switched to LEDs by 2020, the UK would save £1.4 billion, the equivalent of the yearly electricity consumption in Wales.

Andrew Orange, founder of the See the Light campaign says: “The current LED market share is a mere 7%. The UK is not on track to achieve the EU’s 2020 target and we are beginning to lag behind other European countries.”

Slow adoption and resistance to transition has been caused by a number of issues including initial cost – an LED bulb can cost £10 compared to a halogen equivalent of £2. However the energy savings enjoyed after the switch can pay for the investment in as little as a year and the long life of an LED bulb will mean that you will not have to change your lamp for 25 years. Additionally, market forecasts predict a steady fall in LED prices.

The campaigners ask everyone to visit the See the Light website, use the simple free saving calculator and pledge to change to LED and to spread the word across social media.

“We cannot rely upon commercial forces alone to make this essential change. Collectively, we have the power to decommission coal fired power stations – if we made the switch and saved money at the same time,” said  Andrew Orange.

www.seethelight.org.uk

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